Year 2011 Authentic Xinhui Natural Aging Tangerine Peel, Chenpi

ChenPi-001
27 Left in Stock
$35.95 USD
50 grams (1.76 oz) $35.95 USD 27 Left in Stock.
100 grams (3.5 oz) $64.95 USD 24 Left in Stock.
200 grams (7.05 oz) $116.95 USD 27 Left in Stock.
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We were fortunate to acquire Xinhui Chenpi, also known as 新會陳皮, from a local source in Xinhui. The highest quality chenpi is cultivated in Xinhui, Guangdong province, earning it the distinction of Xinhui chenpi.

 

These tangerine peels are meticulously processed by using traditional sun-drying methods. They have been carefully aged in a dry and pristine storage environment since 2011. Upon opening the package, you will immediately be greeted by a distinctive aroma. The exterior displays shades of dark green and brown, while the inner surface reveals a light yellow-white hue with intricate fibrous bundles. When illuminated, the peel turns transparent and clear, emitting a delightful and invigorating citrus fragrance. The taste experience begins with a gentle sweetness but concludes with a slightly pungent and bitter note.

 

This Chenpi is an excellent choice for immediate consumption, allowing you to savor its qualities, as well as for long-term storage to enhance flavor, taste, and health benefits.

 

 

How to Brew:

People often inquire about the ideal tea pairing. Chenpi can be steeped by itself using 3 pieces with hot water for a duration of no more than a minute to extract the best flavor and essence. Alternatively, it's a popular choice to combine with various teas, including green, white, black, and pu-erh teas, as well as other herbal teas. We recommend breaking or cutting two pieces of chenpi and blending them with tea leaves. This mixture can be brewed in the Gongfu Cha style or even simmered in a larger pot.

 

More about Xinhui Chenpi:

Chenpi signifies mature orange peel that undergoes sun-drying. As time elapses, its quality improves. Beyond its role in cooking as a seasoning, chenpi holds significant value as a Chinese herbal medicine. . The cultivation of Xinhui Chenpi has a history of seven hundred years and has been regarded as a tribute due to its exceptional natural conditions. The best Chenpi is produced in Xinhui, Guangdon province.  In contrast, chenpi from other locales was considered less potent medicinally and lacked aroma, leading to a numbing sensation in the mouth. However, lower-grade chenpi products from various provinces also populate the market. Research indicates that the maturation process of this particular citrus peel enriches its "volatile oils" and "flavonoids," thereby enhancing its therapeutic value. The official "chenpi" designation is conferred only after a minimum of three years of aging.

 

Production Method:

Xinhui chenpi is made from the peels of citrus fruits harvested from the core production region of Xinhui Tianma. After meticulous cleaning and sorting, the peels are segmented into three uniform sections. Following a natural air-drying period of four to five hours post-segmentation, the peels lose moisture and soften. Subsequently, the inner layer is scrupulously scraped to create a textured surface. The prepared peels are spread out in drying fields and sun-dried to ensure optimal moisture control. Finally, the dried peels are stored in well-ventilated containers, such as burlap sacks or woven bags, and placed in warehouses to undergo natural aging.

 

Notice:

Chenpi is a common Chinese herb ingredient in traditional Chinese medicine. While chenpi offers health benefits, it's important to be mindful of certain factors when incorporating it into your diet. We recommend that individuals, particularly those with excessive stomach acid, patients currently taking medication, infants, and pregnant women, consult a doctor before consuming chenpi. This precaution is taken to mitigate any potential adverse effects on the body.

The Quick Way - 5 Easy Steps

Step 1

Rinse a teapot, small teacups and a small pitcher with hot water.

Step 2

Put one tablespoon of tea leaves in the teapot for every two people being served. Use more for large leaf tea or for a stronger taste.

Step 3

Place the tea leaves inside the teapot and pour in enough hot water to cover the leaves. Pour out the water immediately to rinse the leaves. Use to this chart for proper water temperatures.

    Green Tea 

    Silver Needle White Teas  

    and most tea made from “tips” 

    75C – 80C 
    /167F – 176F
    Max 85C /185F 

    Taiwan Oolong 

    Tips Red/Black Teas 

    90C – 95C 
    /194F – 203F

    Black Teas 

    Pu-Erh (Bow-Lay)  

    Te Guan Yin (Iron Buddha)  

    Da Hong Pao (Cliff Tea) 

    Lapsang Souchong 

    Phoenix Oolong 

    Aged White Teas 

    95C – boiling 
    / 203F – boiling*

     

    IMPORTANT NOTES: 

    • Too much or too little heat for the tea you are making will break down the leaves too quickly or too slowly and the flavour will be inconsistent.  Temperatures can be approximate.
    • *Boiling means when the water has just reached a slow boil with big bubbles. The Chinese call this “Fish-Eye Water”. For green tea, watch for small streams of tiny bubbles starting to rise from the bottom of the kettle. This is called “Crab-Eye Water”. 
    • For Oolong teas, the correct temperature is somewhere between these two. If you do not have a thermometer, let the water stand for 2 minutes or so after reaching a first boil to get 90 – 95C C / 194 – 203 F. 

    Step 4

    Empty the teacups and pitcher. Pour enough hot water into the teapot again to cover the leaves. Wait 8 - 10 seconds and pour the tea into the pitcher and serve, a little longer for a stronger taste. For additional brews, repeat Step 4, deducting two seconds for the second brew and adding two seconds for each additional brew.

    Step 5

    As the aromatic compounds in the tea leaves dissolve in the water, you will notice the subtle flavours of the tea begin to change with each brew. You will be amazed at the difference! To make tea taste even better, try making tea using Gong Fu Cha method, the traditional Chinese art of tea-making.

     

    The Traditional Way Using The Gong Fu Cha Method

    You will need:

    • Teapot - preferably a small Chinese Yixing teapot. These have the best heat handling properties for tea-making, as well as for developing the flavour. If you only have a large teapot, use the quantities of water as if a small teapot and tea shown on the charts.
    • Small teacups (similar in size to Japanese sake cups) or tiny bowls
    • Kettle
    • Pitcher - small glass or porcelain
    • Fine Strainer - to keep your tea clear and free of sediment
    • Tea Tray - A cookie sheet or large flat dish lined with a towel can make a good tray to prepare your tea on. 

    Step 1 - Warm The Teapot and Pitcher, Sterilize The Teacups and Strainer

    The first step is to use the right size of teapot for the number of people you are serving. Most teas taste best when made using a Yixing unglazed clay teapot.  Use this chart for the correct size of teapot for the number of people you are serving (use this amount of water if you are using a larger teapot). Pour some hot water into the teapot, pitcher, teacups and over the strainer to rinse, warm and sterilize them.

    Size of Teapot

    Volume

    (ml / fl oz)

    Number of People Served

    #1 size

    70 / 2.4

    1 - 2

    #2

    100 / 3.4

    2 - 4

    #3

    175 / 6.0

    3 - 5

    # 4

    225 / 7.6

    4- 6

     

    Referring to this chart, determine the correct water temperature for the type of tea you are making. Too much or too little heat will break down the leaves too quickly or too slowly and the flavour will be inconsistent. Temperatures can be approximate.

    Green Tea 

    Silver Needle White Teas  

    and most tea made from “tips” 

    75C – 80C 
    /167F – 176F
    Max 85C /185F

     

    Taiwan Oolong 

    Tips Red/Black Teas 

    90C – 95C 
    /194F – 203F

    Black Teas 

    Pu-Erh (Bow-Lay)  

    Te Guan Yin ( Iron Buddha)  

    Da Hong Pao (Cliff Tea) 

    Lapsang Souchong 

    Phoenix Oolong 

    Aged White Teas 

     

    95C – boiling 
    / 203F – boiling*

     

    * Boiling means when the water has just reached a slow boil with big bubbles . The Chinese call this “Fish-Eye Water”.  For green tea, watch for small streams of tiny bubbles starting to rise from the bottom of the kettle. This is called “Crab-Eye Water”. 

    For Oolong teas, the correct temperature is somewhere between these two. If you do not have a thermometer, let the water stand for 2 minutes or so after reaching a first boil to get 90 – 97C C / 194 – 206 F. 

    Step 2 – Rinse The Tea Laves

    Empty the teapot and pitcher of the warming water. Place the measured amount of tea into the teapot using this chart and fill with the proper temperature water from the chart above. When pouring water in, allow the water to overflow the top of the teapot until the bubbles disappear and the water runs clear.

    Size 
    of Teapot

    Size of Leaves

    Rolled Leaves 
    (small balls) and Compress-ed

    Less than 1 cm / 3/8 inches

    1 – 2 cm 
    / 3/8 – ¾ inch

    2 - 4 cm 
    / ¾ - 
    1-1/2 inches

    #1 size

    0.5 - 1

    0.5 - 1

    1 – 1.5

    1.5– 2

    #2

    1.5 - 2

    1.5 - 2

    2 – 2.5

    2.5 – 3

    #3

    3 – 3.5

    3 – 3.5

    3.5 – 4

    4 – 4.5

    # 4

    4 – 4.5

    4 – 4.5

    4.5 – 5

    5 – 5.5

     

    This chart shows the amount of tea to use (in number of tablespoons) based on the size of the tea leaves you are using and the size of teapot. Adjust for personal taste.

    Replace the lid and immediately pour off all the water (or a bit longer if using compressed tea) and shake out the last drops. Then tilt the lid slightly open on the teapot. This allows the heat in the teapot to escape and not “cook” the leaves so they can retain their aroma 

    Step 3 –The First Brew

    Fill the teapot until the water flows over the top. Place the lid on the teapot and count the proper number of seconds using this chart. Adjust times to taste.

     

    Rolled Leaves  
    (small balls) and Compressed 

    Less than 1 cm / 3/8 inches 

    1 – 2 cm  
    / 3/8 – ¾ inch 

    2 - 4 cm  
    / ¾ -  
    1-1/2 inches 

    Rinse the leaves 

    4 - 8 seconds 

    pour off the tea as quickly as possible 

    1- 3 seconds 

    2 - 4 seconds 

    First Brew 

    10– 15 seconds 

    1 – 2 seconds 

    9– 12 seconds 

    2 – 15 seconds 

    Second Brew 

    8– 13 seconds 

    2– 4 seconds 

    8– 10 seconds 

    10– 13 seconds 

    Third Brew 

    6– 10 seconds 

    4– 6 seconds 

    6–8 seconds 

    8– 10 seconds 

    Fourth Brew 

    4– 10 seconds 

    4– 6 seconds 

    6– 8 seconds 

    8– 10 seconds 

    Fifth Brew 

    6– 12 seconds 

    8– 8 seconds 

    8– 10 seconds 

    10– 12 seconds 

     

    If you have a tea tray, slowly pour a little hot water over the teapot for a few seconds while counting.  At the end of the count, pour the tea into the pitcher and tilt the lid open on the teapot. Empty the teacups of the warming water and serve the tea. 

    Step 4 – Additional Brews

    For the second brew, repeat Step 3 until there is no more flavour from the leaves. High quality tea will make many good tasting brews. The taste of low quality tea will start to fade after only a few brews. Believe it or not, high quality tea is usually less expensive to use in the long run than low quality tea, it tastes better and lasts longer!

    If the leaves still have some flavour remaining when you finish, you can keep them in the teapot with the lid closed for up to 12 hours. When you're ready to make more tea, just pick up the timing for the next brew where you left off, less a few seconds.

    Congratulations!

    Congratulations, you are now ready to move on to a more advanced level of tea-making. For full instructions about Gong Fu Cha, see Gong Fu Cha - The Complete Guide To Making Chinese Tea by Daniel Lui)

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