Pu-Erh Tea Cake, Yi Chang Hao Zhen Pin, Chang Tai Tea Factory, Year 2005 (Raw/Sheng)

PUGC-05-ZHEN-0001
30 Left in Stock
$29.95 USD
50 grams (2.1 oz) $29.95 USD 30 Left in Stock.
150 grams (5.3 oz) $53.95 USD 10 Left in Stock.
Full Cake 380 grams (13.4 oz) $101.95 USD 5 Left in Stock.
Regular price
Pu-Erh Tea Cake, Yi Chang Hao Zhen Pin, Chang Tai Tea Factory, Year 2005 (Green/Sheng) Pu-Erh Tea Cake, Yi Chang Hao Zhen Pin, Chang Tai Tea Factory, Year 2005 (Green/Sheng) Pu-Erh Tea Cake, Yi Chang Hao Zhen Pin, Chang Tai Tea Factory, Year 2005 (Green/Sheng) Pu-Erh Tea Cake, Yi Chang Hao Zhen Pin, Chang Tai Tea Factory, Year 2005 (Green/Sheng) Pu-Erh Tea Cake, Yi Chang Hao Zhen Pin, Chang Tai Tea Factory, Year 2005 (Green/Sheng)

Like other Yi ChaMade using the old processing techniques. Wild leaves blended with tips and stems gives excellent complexity and a long lasting rich taste with floral and honey notes. Thick texture. The 1999 tea from this manufacturer is a collector's item so this tea promises to be an excellent finding.

Like other Yi Chang Hao teas, this cake also blends a lot of big leaves from half-arbor trees. This tea cake is additionally blended with the more buds which brings a comfortable floral fragrance to the leaves. The taste is sweet and robust.

Tea: Yi Chang Hao Zhen Pin, Chang Tai Tea Factory, Year 2005 (Raw/Sheng)

Factory: Chang Tai Tea Factory

Origin: YiWu Mountain

Types: Sheng/Raw

Harvest Period: 2005

The Quick Way - 5 Easy Steps

Step 1

Rinse a teapot, small teacups and a small pitcher with hot water.

Step 2

Put one tablespoon of tea leaves in the teapot for every two people being served. Use more for large leaf tea or for a stronger taste.

Step 3

Place the tea leaves inside the teapot and pour in enough hot water to cover the leaves. Pour out the water immediately to rinse the leaves. Use to this chart for proper water temperatures.

    Green Tea 

    Silver Needle White Teas  

    and most tea made from “tips” 

    75C – 80C 
    /167F – 176F
    Max 85C /185F 

    Taiwan Oolong 

    Tips Red/Black Teas 

    90C – 95C 
    /194F – 203F

    Black Teas 

    Pu-Erh (Bow-Lay)  

    Te Guan Yin (Iron Buddha)  

    Da Hong Pao (Cliff Tea) 

    Lapsang Souchong 

    Phoenix Oolong 

    Aged White Teas 

    95C – boiling 
    / 203F – boiling*

     

    IMPORTANT NOTES: 

    • Too much or too little heat for the tea you are making will break down the leaves too quickly or too slowly and the flavour will be inconsistent.  Temperatures can be approximate.
    • *Boiling means when the water has just reached a slow boil with big bubbles. The Chinese call this “Fish-Eye Water”. For green tea, watch for small streams of tiny bubbles starting to rise from the bottom of the kettle. This is called “Crab-Eye Water”. 
    • For Oolong teas, the correct temperature is somewhere between these two. If you do not have a thermometer, let the water stand for 2 minutes or so after reaching a first boil to get 90 – 95C C / 194 – 203 F. 

    Step 4

    Empty the teacups and pitcher. Pour enough hot water into the teapot again to cover the leaves. Wait 8 - 10 seconds and pour the tea into the pitcher and serve, a little longer for a stronger taste.
    For additional brews, repeat Step 4, deducting two seconds for the second brew and adding two seconds for each additional brew.

    Step 5

    As the aromatic compounds in the tea leaves dissolve in the water, you will notice the subtle flavours of the tea begin to change with each brew. You will be amazed at the difference! To make tea taste even better, try making tea using Gong Fu Cha method, the traditional Chinese art of tea-making.

     

    The Traditional Way Using The Gong Fu Cha Method

    You will need:

    • Teapot - preferably a small Chinese Yixing teapot. These have the best heat handling properties for tea-making, as well as for developing the flavour. If you only have a large teapot, use the quantities of water as if a small teapot and tea shown on the charts.
    • Small teacups (similar in size to Japanese sake cups) or tiny bowls
    • Kettle
    • Pitcher - small glass or porcelain
    • Fine Strainer - to keep your tea clear and free of sediment
    • Tea Tray - A cookie sheet or large flat dish lined with a towel can make a good tray to prepare your tea on. 

    Step 1 - Warm The Teapot and Pitcher, Sterilize The Teacups and Strainer

    The first step is to use the right size of teapot for the number of people you are serving. Most teas taste best when made using a Yixing unglazed clay teapot.  Use this chart for the correct size of teapot for the number of people you are serving (use this amount of water if you are using a larger teapot). Pour some hot water into the teapot, pitcher, teacups and over the strainer to rinse, warm and sterilize them.

    Size of Teapot

    Volume

    (ml / fl oz)

    Number of People Served

    #1 size

    70 / 2.4

    1 - 2

    #2

    100 / 3.4

    2 - 4

    #3

    175 / 6.0

    3 - 5

    # 4

    225 / 7.6

    4- 6

     

    Referring to this chart, determine the correct water temperature for the type of tea you are making. Too much or too little heat will break down the leaves too quickly or too slowly and the flavour will be inconsistent. Temperatures can be approximate.

    Green Tea 

    Silver Needle White Teas  

    and most tea made from “tips” 

    75C – 80C 
    /167F – 176F
    Max 85C /185F

     

    Taiwan Oolong 

    Tips Red/Black Teas 

    90C – 95C 
    /194F – 203F

    Black Teas 

    Pu-Erh (Bow-Lay)  

    Te Guan Yin ( Iron Buddha)  

    Da Hong Pao (Cliff Tea) 

    Lapsang Souchong 

    Phoenix Oolong 

    Aged White Teas 

     

    95C – boiling 
    / 203F – boiling*

     

    * Boiling means when the water has just reached a slow boil with big bubbles . The Chinese call this “Fish-Eye Water”.  For green tea, watch for small streams of tiny bubbles starting to rise from the bottom of the kettle. This is called “Crab-Eye Water”. 

    For Oolong teas, the correct temperature is somewhere between these two. If you do not have a thermometer, let the water stand for 2 minutes or so after reaching a first boil to get 90 – 97C C / 194 – 206 F. 

    Step 2 – Rinse The Tea Laves

    Empty the teapot and pitcher of the warming water. Place the measured amount of tea into the teapot using this chart and fill with the proper temperature water from the chart above. When pouring water in, allow the water to overflow the top of the teapot until the bubbles disappear and the water runs clear.

    Size 
    of Teapot

    Size of Leaves

    Rolled Leaves 
    (small balls) and Compress-ed

    Less than 1 cm / 3/8 inches

    1 – 2 cm 
    / 3/8 – ¾ inch

    2 - 4 cm 
    / ¾ - 
    1-1/2 inches

    #1 size

    0.5 - 1

    0.5 - 1

    1 – 1.5

    1.5– 2

    #2

    1.5 - 2

    1.5 - 2

    2 – 2.5

    2.5 – 3

    #3

    3 – 3.5

    3 – 3.5

    3.5 – 4

    4 – 4.5

    # 4

    4 – 4.5

    4 – 4.5

    4.5 – 5

    5 – 5.5

     

    This chart shows the amount of tea to use (in number of tablespoons) based on the size of the tea leaves you are using and the size of teapot. Adjust for personal taste.

    Replace the lid and immediately pour off all the water (or a bit longer if using compressed tea) and shake out the last drops. Then tilt the lid slightly open on the teapot. This allows the heat in the teapot to escape and not “cook” the leaves so they can retain their aroma 

    Step 3 –The First Brew

    Fill the teapot until the water flows over the top. Place the lid on the teapot and count the proper number of seconds using this chart. Adjust times to taste.

     

    Rolled Leaves  
    (small balls) and Compressed 

    Less than 1 cm / 3/8 inches 

    1 – 2 cm  
    / 3/8 – ¾ inch 

    2 - 4 cm  
    / ¾ -  
    1-1/2 inches 

    Rinse the leaves 

    4 - 8 seconds 

    pour off the tea as quickly as possible 

    1- 3 seconds 

    2 - 4 seconds 

    First Brew 

    10– 15 seconds 

    1 – 2 seconds 

    9– 12 seconds 

    2 – 15 seconds 

    Second Brew 

    8– 13 seconds 

    2– 4 seconds 

    8– 10 seconds 

    10– 13 seconds 

    Third Brew 

    6– 10 seconds 

    4– 6 seconds 

    6–8 seconds 

    8– 10 seconds 

    Fourth Brew 

    4– 10 seconds 

    4– 6 seconds 

    6– 8 seconds 

    8– 10 seconds 

    Fifth Brew 

    6– 12 seconds 

    8– 8 seconds 

    8– 10 seconds 

    10– 12 seconds 

     

    If you have a tea tray, slowly pour a little hot water over the teapot for a few seconds while counting.  At the end of the count, pour the tea into the pitcher and tilt the lid open on the teapot. Empty the teacups of the warming water and serve the tea. 

    Step 4 – Additional Brews

    For the second brew, repeat Step 3 until there is no more flavour from the leaves. High quality tea will make many good tasting brews. The taste of low quality tea will start to fade after only a few brews. Believe it or not, high quality tea is usually less expensive to use in the long run than low quality tea, it tastes better and lasts longer!

    If the leaves still have some flavour remaining when you finish, you can keep them in the teapot with the lid closed for up to 12 hours. When you're ready to make more tea, just pick up the timing for the next brew where you left off, less a few seconds.

    Congratulations!

    Congratulations, you are now ready to move on to a more advanced level of tea-making. For full instructions about Gong Fu Cha, see Gong Fu Cha - The Complete Guide To Making Chinese Tea by Daniel Lui)

    茶精灵

    Find Your Perfect TeaAsk The Tea Wizard

    Don't know which tea is right for you? Answer a few questions and the Online Wizard will show you all the Chinese teas that suit your taste.

    Question 1

    I prefer a taste that is:

    Light, subtle and elegant

    Light, subtle and elegant

    Strong and full bodied

    Strong and full bodied

    Question 2

    I like my tea to:

    Be Calming

    Be Calming

    Give Me Energy

    Give Me Energy

    Question 3

    I prefer a taste that is (think of cheese or wine):

    New

    New

    Aged

    Aged

    Question 4

    Select tones or notes:

    Sweet

    Sweet

    Nutty

    Nutty

    Grassy

    Grassy

    Fruity

    Fruity

    Woody

    Woody

    Spicy

    Spicy

    Honey

    Honey

    Earthy

    Earthy

    Floral

    Floral

    Buttery

    Buttery

    Smoky

    Smoky

    Roasted

    Roasted

    Herb

    Herb

    Chocolate

    Chocolate